Posts

Raiders, Rulers and Traders by David Chaffetz

Forthcoming, July 30, 2024. In Raiders, Rulers and Traders | The Horse and The Rose of Empires, scholar of Asian history David Chaffetz tells the story of the steppe raiders, rulers, and traders who amassed power and wealth on horseback from the Bronze Age through the twentieth century. Drawing on a wealth of primary sources—in Persian, Turkish, Russian, and Chinese—Chaffetz presents a groundbreaking new view of what has been known as the “Silk Road,” and a lively history of the great horse empires that shaped civilization.

When Washington Burned by Robert P. Watson

When Washington Burned | The British Invasion of the Capital and a Nation’s Rise from the Ashes by Robert P. Watson looks deeper into the dark day in American history when the country’s capital fell to the British. The book narrates and examines the British campaign and American missteps that led to the fall of Washington during the War of 1812.

The Last Secret of the Secret Annex by Joop van Wijk-Voskuijl and Jeroen De Bruyn

The Last Secret of the Secret Annex | The Untold Story of Anne Frank, Her Silent Protector, and a Family Betrayal by Joop van Wijk-Voskuijl and Jeroen De Bruyn looks deeper into the stories surrounding the Frank family and those protecting them in the secret annex. 

Victorious in Defeat by Alexander V. Pantsov and Steven I. Levine

Victorious in Defeat | The Life and Times of Chiang Kai-shek, China, 1887-1975 by Alexander V. Pantsov and Steven I. Levine looks back on the life of Chinese leader Chiang Kai-Shek. The authors shed new light on the role played by the Russians in Chiang’s political career as well as on Chiang’s complex relationship with top officials of the United States

The Peking Express by James M. Zimmerman

The Peking Express | The Bandits Who Stole a Train, Stunned the West, and Broke the Republic of China by James M. Zimmerman examines the high-stakes capture of the Peking Express. The book is the incredible, long-forgotten story of a hostage crisis that shocked China and the West. It vividly captures the events that made international headlines.

Lost in the Cold War by John T. Downey, Thomas J. Christensen, and Jack Lee Downey

Lost in the Cold War | The Story of Jack Downey, America’s Longest-Held POW by John T. Downey, Thomas J. Christensen, and Jack Lee Downey recounts the story of Jack Downey’s time as a prisoner in Cold War China. Downey’s lively and gripping memoir—written in secret late in life—interweaves horrors and deprivation with humor and the absurdities of captivity.

The Snatch Racket by Carolyn Cox

The Snatch Racket | The Kidnapping Epidemic That Terrorized 1930s America by Carolyn Cox provides a view of the prevalence of child kidnappings during the Great Depression. Although the 1932 kidnapping of aviator Charles Lindbergh’s baby was a worldwide sensation, it was only one of an estimated three thousand ransom kidnappings that occurred in the United States that year. The epidemic hit America during the Great Depression and the last days of Prohibition as criminal gangs turned kidnapping into the highly lucrative “snatch racket.”

When the Iron Bird Flies by Jianglin Li

When the Iron Bird Flies | China’s Secret War in Tibet by Jianglin Li tells the untold story of China’s military operations in Tibet. The book breaks this decades long silence to reveal for the first time a comprehensive and explosive picture of the six years that would prove definitive in modern Tibetan and Chinese history.

A Thousand Years of Joys and Sorrows by Ai Weiwei

A Thousand Years of Joys and Sorrows: A Memoir, written by Ai Weiwei, was published on November 2, 2021. The book chronicles Ai Weiwei’s early years and the myriad forces that have shaped modern China. Recounting the memories of Weiwei’s childhood spent in exile with his father, poet Ai Qing, who Mao Zedong branded a “rightist intellectual” for his critical view of the government.

Chicago’s Great Fire by Carl Smith

Chicago’s Great Fire | The Destruction and Resurrection of an Iconic American City by Carl Smith

Between October 8–10, 1871, much of the city of Chicago was destroyed by one of the most legendary urban fires in history. Incorporated as a city in 1837, Chicago had grown at a breathtaking pace in barely three decades, from just over 4,000 in 1840 to greater than 330,000 at the time of the fire.